HOW TO MAKE A GRAPHIC NOVEL (4/7)

(Continued from Part 3)

REVIEW

Ask the students which comics and books they read yesterday. Ask if they watched any movies or tv shows and if they were able to pick out signs of a three-act structure. It’s a big concept to take in at first, but once students are able to see the structure, they will see its pattern all around them. Take a few minutes to quickly review each act as discussed last class period.

3ActStructure

BRUSHES & INK

Prepare a pencil drawing before class and present it to the students. Show how to properly draw lightly with a pencil to lay the framework for the ink drawing and talk briefly about which details to include and which to leave out.

4

Using a brush of your choice (I prefer the Akashiya Brush Pen or a size 3 sable) and a bottle of ink (Higgins Black Magic is great), give the students a 5-10 minute demonstration of inking techniques, including: thick-to-thin strokes, dry brush, cross-hatching, stippling, and blocking in areas with black. Be sure to demonstrate how to draw with your arm, rather than with your wrist.

Here is Power Up creator, Doug TenNapel, doing what he does best (click for video):

3

IMITATE A MASTER

Invite the students to choose from a selection of graphic novels and comics available in the classroom. They will be picking a single panel from the comic to draw for the next 60-90 minutes. Help the students find panels that include the following:

  • One or two figures (these can be people or animals)
  • Text (this can be dialogue, a caption, or an onomatopoeia)
  • A variety in line quality (thick and thin brushstrokes, rough and smooth textures)
  • A background

This will help the students in focusing on using their brushes properly. Give the students a short amount of time to lightly pencil in their drawing on bristol board (filling up as much of the page as possible), and then let them loose with the ink!

19

14

20

15

Ask the students what they like about using the brushes and ink. Did they notice anything different about the picture or the way they draw when they were inking their image? Ask each student to talk about why they chose their panel and have them talk about their favorite parts of the process and the finished drawing.

END OF PART 4

Start at Part 1 to learn more about the workshop and what we’re doing, and be sure to subscribe for more posts (top-right of this page).

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