Darkbound

Darkbound Takes You Where You Fear

Big news for fans of horror, thrillers, and good writing: today marks the release of best-selling author Michaelbrent Collings’s newest horror novel, Darkbound!

“The New York subway system has: 656 miles of track… 468 stations… 31 thousand turnstiles… and 1.64 BILLION fares yearly. For six of those fares, the trip is going to be one they will never forget. Six strangers will board a subway. But this subway is unlike the others. This subway doesn’t take you where you want or where you need. It takes you where you fear. This subway…is DARKBOUND.”

Michaelbrent Collings

Michaelbrent Collings is a novelist and screenwriter. He has written numerous bestsellers, including Apparition, The Haunted, The Loon, Rising Fears, and the bestselling YA fantasy series The Billy Saga. I count myself fortunate to have met Michaelbrent and even sit with him on a panel, and I can add to his lengthy list of credentials that he is an all-around great guy who loves to write and share his passion for his writing.

I thought we could celebrate Michaelbrent’s newest release and his writing as a whole by sharing some of the writing advice he’s shared via his website.

Writing Advice

Take a minute to scroll through the titles on Michaelbrent’s page of writing advice. Go ahead, I’ll wait. Pretty great stuff, don’t you think? I absolutely love when capable authors are willing to share their own experiences and insight into their craft; when they realize that, though they might be best-selling authors or widely popular, their goal is the same as every other writer’s: to write better.

Chubby Writing

Here’s a snippet from a post entitled Chubby Writing:

Fat writing, like fat people, suffers from inactivity more than anything. Just as an obese person lives on a diet of junk food, fast food, and various things you can find fried at the county fair, so chubby writing exists on a steady and corroding diet of passive tense. Tossing back any form of “to be” adds ten pounds to your sentence, making it slow and clunky.

Check out these two paragraphs. The first one is from my book, The Haunted, which at the time of this writing is in its second straight month on amazon.com’s bestselling horror:

Then, just as he felt himself about to give in, about to lose himself in the irrational fear (and what other kind of fear was there but the irrational, for rationality fled in the face of terror, the ability to be a thinking human being ran before the onslaught of horror), his fingers felt the cool links of the chain. He grabbed it like a man about to fall off a high cliff would grab a tethering line.

Nice, huh? It moves forward, actively and resolutely. It’s a decent example of well-weighted writing. But add just a few junk-food “to be” words, and see what happens:

Then, just as he was about to feel like he was about to give in, about to be lost himself in the irrational fear (and what other kind of fear was there but the irrational, for to be rational was something that would flee if it was faced by terror, the ability to be a thinking human being would have run before terror which was like an onslaught of horror), his fingers were able to feel the cool links of the chain. He was going to hold it like a man who was about to fall off a cliff and was going to grab a line that would tether him.

Wow. Chubby writing. Worse, this writing is downright riddled with lard and excess weight.

How great is that?! My writing could definitely benefit from some serious fat loss.

Read More from Michaelbrent Collings

I could copy and paste just about everything from his site, but I’d rather just point you to the source itself. Find Michaelbrent online at: MichaelbrentCollings.com, facebook, and twitter. Also, be sure to check out Darkbound (out today in paperback and for kindle!) and Michaelbrent’s other books.

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